Our Stories are Valuable

I’m still alive. 27 years on this Earth. A microscopic amount of time compared to the existence of the universe. 

What do I do with this time that I’ve been gifted? I’ve always put so much pressure on myself to make sure I spend my time doing valuable things. However, I’ve finally realized that no matter what I decide to do with my time, it is automatically valuable because it’s how I chose to spend the time. 

The most valuable possession we all have is time. 

With our time in this world, we have moments and our experiences. We share those moments and experiences through stories. 

Therefore, our stories are valuable. 

I wonder if what makes our stories so valuable is the power of them….the power of our stories connecting us….the power of our stories causing us to feel. Our stories connect us through feelings.

We need to share our stories. By sharing your story, you are improving the universe. 

Hear me out. Connections with others provide good energy to others, which results in more good energy in the universe. So ultimately sharing your value can affirm others’ value in the universe, and it spreads good energy all around. 

If you are thinking, “I don’t really have a story to tell,” then you are mistaken. We are all walking around as authors to our own story. No one has lived your exact experiences. No one else can narrate your perspective of your life. 

If you feel your story is boring, it is still valuable. Your story can be: “I was born. I grew up with my family. I got a job. I got kids. I watch tv for fun. I’m just living.” That is valuable! Your story may seem boring to you, but it is probably relatable to other people, AND there are details throughout your day-to-day that connect you to others while still being unique. 

If you feel your story is full of sadness, it is still valuable. Sharing the pain throughout your life will connect with many others who also experience pain. Everyone has different levels of suffering, but we can empathize since the package deal of the human experience includes suffering. Hearing how you navigate through pain can help someone navigate through their pain. That is valuable! 

Essentially your story is a piece of the puzzle of this universe. Your time here connects with other people’s time here and answers the existential questions bestowed upon us. 

By and by, I plan to share my story because I am understanding my worth in this world. Hope you share your story as well.

Top 7 Thoughts of a Suicidal Person

DISCLAIMER.WARNING.CAUTION: In absolutely no way am I encouraging or promoting suicide. If you are suicidal, please talk to someone either about this to work through the catalysts of these thoughts or something else to distract yourself from your thoughts. Suicide is not a solution no matter how many times you have rationalized it in your brain. The point of this article is to give perspective on the thoughts of a suicidal person so that people can have a better understanding of where we are coming from so that people’s support and help can be beneficial, and hopefully life changing.

Sooo suicide huh? I mean if you’ve never thought about taking your life or believing that your life is so worthless that you should end it all, then you have no idea what we are going through. No, I’m not a representative of all depressed and suicidal people. All I can do is give you perspective so that you can properly have an idea of what some of us are feeling so that it can in turn lead you to properly help us in our times of need.

So I have been quoted to say that I am a “survivor of my suicidal thoughts”. But people don’t really know the thoughts that are swirling through your head when you are rationalizing taking that gun, those pills, the knife, that jump, some poison, or whatever other ‘googled’ way to end your life.

So here are the top 7 thoughts (from my personal experience) that go through my head when I’m suicidal:

Image result for suicidal person cartoon
Source: https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/wellness-prevention/after-13-reasons-why-a-spotlight-on-teen-suicide-warning-signs 

1. “I want the pain to end.”

Whether you are going through physical pain, mental turmoil, abuse, or a combination of these and other pains, you have a sincere desire to want the pain to end. Pain is not fun to endure…obviously. Logically, you are trying to find the solution of how your pain should end. Therefore, ending life altogether, in the suicidal person’s rationale, will inherently end the pain.

Related image
Source: https://kidshelpline.com.au/teens/issues/my-friend-thinking-about-suicide 

2. “Loved ones will be upset at first, but they’ll get over it.”

Contrary to popular belief, the consequences to the people you leave behind constantly resides in your rationale during the low depths of your suicidal thoughts. Many people’s “prevention method” for convincing someone to not be suicidal is to shame someone with the branding of being selfish. We know that there will be pain in loved ones’ lives. We know that it will be a tragically difficult reality to face if we decided to take our lives. We know that guilt will be grappling family members who for some reason feel they could’ve been my hero. However, we know it will also just be a reaction of mourning. After time passes, you will be okay and get on with life because time forces you to get over it. It’s nothing personal, it’s just how life works. (Again, this is the rationale of a suicidal person…)

Image result for low self worth
Source: https://www.youthbeyondblue.com/understand-what%27s-going-on/low-self-esteem-and-body-image 

3. “I’m not worth anything.”

Low self-worth is a major factor of suicidal thinking and depression. I genuinely do not see value in my life. I am not worth anything to anybody. I am no one’s priority. These are facts in my mind that constantly repeat themselves. It’s usually ingrained in my day-to-day actions and brain hard-wiring. Therefore, what do you usually do with things that you do not find value in? You classify it as trash and throw it away.

Image result for misunderstood person cartoon
Source: https://notices.californiatimes.com/gdpr/latimes.com/ 

4. “No one understands me.”

Oh my gosh. This is probably one of THE MOST common thoughts of people in general. However, as a suicidal person, this provides more of a reason to end it all. Psychologists are correct with that whole need of belonging. When you feel understood, you feel as though you belong. The more I personally feel that I’m not understood, the more I feel that I do not belong on this Earth. (Now that I think about it, no wonder people surround themselves with people who share similar views as them…it feels good to be understood & provides validation in your thoughts & inevitably your existence.)

 

Image result for happy world cartoon
Source: https://pngio.com/PNG/3947-happy-world-png.html 

5. “The world would be better off if I’m dead.”

Yeah, this is an extremely morbid thought, but true in the mind of some suicidal people. I know I find “evidence” in my life to support this thinking, like “Oh, I said something shitty to someone I supposedly love and have caused them pain. They would have never endured this pain if I was never born” Or “People in my life are blaming me for all of this shitty stuff so I might as well die.” This thought can be tied to the thought of wanting the pain to end.

Image result for what's the point meme
Source: https://memegenerator.net/instance/75949017/gloomy-eeyore-whats-the-point-anymore 

6. “There is no point to live.”

What’s the point? If you are ever with someone who is truly considering suicide, they are constantly asking this question. If a psychologist, friend, family member, or caring human is asked this question from somebody, please keep in mind that “There is no point to live” is the driving force behind the inquiry of ‘What’s the point?’

Image result for what do i deserve
Source: https://www.123rf.com/photo_63179300_women-hand-writing-what-do-i-deserve-with-black-marker-on-visual-screen-isolated-on-white-business-t.html 

7. “I don’t deserve to live.”

This thought has strong ties with thoughts #3 (“I’m not worth anything.”) and  #5 (“The world would be better off if I’m dead”).  The whole concept of deserving something is based on self-worth. For some reason, a suicidal person may have convinced themselves along the way that they do not deserve any joy or happiness in the world, unfortunately.

Sooooo yeah. I honestly don’t know what to say after all that. It’s my truth. It’s my constant thoughts. However, I still hold on to life…waiting to see if evolution of the mind is possible. I guess my curiosity (and deep fear of pain) causes me to hold on to see the one day where I laugh at the absurdity of these thoughts ever being my thoughts, instead of still believing in them fully. (This conclusion was for those of you who need the silver lining in everything.)